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Nvidia is training robots to learn new skills by observing humans. Initial experiments with the process have seen a Baxter robot learn to pick up and move colored boxes and a toy car in a lab environment. The researchers hope the development of the new deep-learning based system will go some way to train robots to work alongside humans in both manufacturing and home settings. “In the manufacturing environment, robots are really good at repeatedly executing the same trajectory over and over again, but they don’t adapt to changes in the environment, and they don’t learn their tasks, ” Nvidia principal research scientist Stan Birchfield told VentureBeat. “So to repurpose a robot to execute a new task, you have to bring in an expert to reprogram the robot at a fairly low level, and it’s an expensive operation. What we’re interested in doing is making it easier for a non-expert user to teach a robot a new task by simply showing it what to do.” The researchers trained a sequence of neural networks to perform duties associated with perception, program generation, and program execution. The result was that the robot was able to learn a new task from a single demonstration in the real world. Once the robot witnesses the task, it generates a human-readable description of the states required to complete the task. A human can then correct the steps if necessary before execution on the real robot. “There’s sort of a paradigm shift happening in the robotics community now, ” Birchfield said. “We’re at the point now where we can use GPUs to generate essentially a limitless amount of pre-labeled data essentially for free to develop and test algorithms. And this is potentially going to allow us to develop these robotics systems that need to learn how to interact with the world around them in ways that scale better and are safer.” In a video released by the researchers, human operator shows a pair of stacks of cubes to the robot. The system then understands an appropriate program and correctly places the cubes in the correct order. Information gathered by - Robotics for u. Bangalore Robotics, BTM Robotics training center, Robotics spares, Bannerghatta Robotics training center, best robotics training in bangalore,
Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gestures Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory system enable people to correct robot mistakes on multiple-choice tasks. Getting robots to do things isn’t easy, usually, scientists have to either explicitly program them or get them to understand how humans communicate via language. But what if we could control robots more intuitively, using just hand gestures and brainwaves? A new system spearheaded by researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) aims to do exactly that, allowing users to instantly correct robot mistakes with nothing more than brain signals and the flick of a finger. Building off the team’s past work focused on simple binary-choice activities, the new work expands the scope to multiple-choice tasks, opening up new possibilities for how human workers could manage teams of robots. By monitoring brain activity, the system can detect in real-time if a person notices an error as a robot does a task. Using an interface that measures muscle activity, the person can then make hand gestures to scroll through and select the correct option for the robot to execute. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
Flying Dragon Robot Transforms Itself to Squeeze Through Gaps. Dragon can change its shape to move through complex environments and even manipulate objects. There’s been a lot of recent focus on applications for aerial robots, and one of the areas with the most potential is indoors. The thing about indoors is that by definition you have to go through doors to get there, and once you’re inside, there are all kinds of things that are horribly dangerous to aerial robots, like more doors, walls, windows, people, furniture, hanging plants, lampshades, and other aerial robots, inevitably followed by still more doors. One solution is to make your robots super small, so that they can fit through small openings without running into something fragile and expensive, but then you’re stuck with small robots that can’t do a whole heck of a lot. Another solution is to put your robots in protective cages, but then you’re stuck with robots that can’t as easily interact with their environment, even if they want to. Ideally, you’d want a robot that doesn’t need that level of protection, that’s somehow large and powerful but also small and nimble at the same time. At JSK Lab at the University of Tokyo, roboticists have developed a robot called DRAGON, which (obviously) stands for for “Dual-rotor embedded multilink Robot with the Ability of multi-degree-of-freedom aerial transformation.” It’s a modular flying robot powered by ducted fans that can transform literally on the fly, from a square to a snake to anything in between, allowing it to stretch out to pass through small holes and then make whatever other shape you want once it’s on the other side. DRAGON is made of a series of linked modules, each of which consists of a pair of ducted fan thrusters that can be actuated in roll and pitch to vector thrust in just about any direction you need. The modules are connected to one another with a powered hinged joint, and the whole robot is driven by an Intel Euclid and powered by a battery pack (providing 3 minutes of flight time, which is honestly more than I would have thought), mounted along the robot’s spine. This particular prototype is made up of four modules, allowing it to behave sort of like a quad rotor, even though I suppose technically it’s an octorotor. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
A paralyzed man successfully completes London Marathon with an exo-suit. It took him 36 hours and required the support of a robotic exo-suit. But an inspiring British paraplegic has become the first paralyzed person to finish the punishing London Marathon. Simon Kindleysides spent the better part of the last two days covering the entire 26 miles (42 kilometers). As he was paralyzed from the waist down, he used a rewalk exo-suit in order to walk. In 2013, health experts informed Kindleysides that he had a functional neurological disorder and a glioma tumor in his brain. The double whammy turned him into a paraplegic. The 33-year-old resident of Blofield, Norfolk refused to be crippled by his paralysis. In 2015, he raised close to $7, 000 for charity by traveling from London to Paris using a hand cycle, an arm-powered version of a bicycle. On April 22, 2018, Kindleysides was one of the 40, 000 participants in one of the most arduous races in the world. The winner of the race was Eliud Kipchoge, who crossed the finish line at The Mall in slightly over two hours, just shy of a world record. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
This Terrifying Robot Wolf is protecting the crops of Japanese Farmers For the last eight months, farms near Kisarazu City in Japan have been home to a horrifying robot wolf. But don’t worry; it wasn’t created to terrorize local residents (although, from the looks of the thing, it probably did). Its official name is “Super Monster Wolf, ” and engineers designed it to stop animals from eating farmers’ crops. In truth, the story of the robot wolf is more than a little sad. As Motherboard reports, wolves went extinct in Japan in the early 1800s. A state-sponsored eradication campaign. Now, parts of Japan are overrun with deer and wild boar. They love to feast on farmers’ rice and chestnut crops. Obviously, farmers do not love this. Fast forward 200 years and humans create a robotic wolf to replace the species they killed off. But there is some good here. The first official trial of the robot wolf just ended and surprised it was a resounding success. In fact, it was such a success that the wolf is entering mass production next month. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP Nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP Nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
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