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Demand for Artificial intelligence & robotics experts to be higher by 50-60% in 2018 Artificial intelligence (AI) is the buzz in the jobs bazaar as machine learning and the Internet of Things (IoT) increasingly influence business strategies and analytics. Human resource and search experts estimate a 50-60% higher demand for AI and robotics professionals in 2018 even as machines take over repetitive manual work. “Machines are taking over repetitive tasks. Robotics, AI, big data, and analytics will be competencies that will be in great demand, ” said Shakun Khanna, senior director at Oracle for the Asia-Pacific region. Organizations are being pushed to become even more efficient as jobs turn predictable, said Rishabh Kaul, co-founder of recruitment startup Belong, which helps clients search for and hire AI professionals. “There is a significant increase in the adoption of AI and automation across enterprises, leading to a skyrocketing of demand for professionals in these fields, ” he said. Jobs in the IoT ecosystem have grown fourfold in the last three years, according to estimates by Belong. These are related to engagement technologies and data capture among other areas. Demand for professionals in the realm of data analysis, including data scientists, has grown by almost 76% in the past few years in AI. The demand is at the entry level as well as middle to senior ranks across sectors such as business, financial services and insurance (BFSI), e-commerce, startups, business process outsourcing (BPO), information technology (IT), pharmaceuticals, healthcare, and retail. “Robotics is required by process-oriented companies for a better customer experience. It helps in cutting down cost and improves efficiency, ” said Thammaiah BN, managing director, Kelly Services India. “AI is helping companies to be in spaces so far not thought of. Organizations can accomplish new things, new products, and services through AI.” Companies want to mine the data they have accumulated over the years, said Sinosh Panicker, partner, Hunt Partners. “AI helps them predict and position their products better and push out new things, ” he said. However, there’s an acute demand-supply mismatch for AI talent across industries, experts said. Candidates for AI roles related to natural language processing (NLP), deep learning, and machine learning are thin on the ground, according to the Belong Talent Supply Index. The ratio of the number of people to jobs in deep learning is 0.53, while for machine learning it’s 0.63 and for NLP it’s 0.71. Only 4% of AI professionals in India have worked on cutting-edge technologies such as deep learning and neural networks, the key ingredients in building advanced AI-related solutions, said Kaul. A few academic institutions such as the Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) in Kharagpur and Kanpur, the Indian Institute of Information Technology (IIIT) in Hyderabad and the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) in Bengaluru have specialized disciplines or centres for artificial intelligence and machine learning. “In fact, according to our internal research, less than 2% of professionals who call themselves data scientists or data engineers have a PhD in AI-related technologies, ” said Kaul. Such is the need for talent that it is prompting top business schools, including the Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs), to include AI and machine learning in their curriculum and expose students to the full ecosystem of IoT. The IIMs in Bangalore and Kozhikode and premier B-Schools like the SP Jain Institute of Management & Research (SPJIMR) are offering courses on AI, robotics, and IoT that can be connected to business strategy to enhance performance, output and customer experience. Some are learning skills through various other courses, including online ones. “People who are keeping themselves abreast with new age technologies and have the right set of required skills under the same are in high demand, ” said ABC Consultants director Ratna Gupta. Content gathered by BTM robotics training centre, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP Nagar, robotics training centres in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centres in JP Nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
Terminator REBOOTING: Smart microchip can self-start and operate even when the battery runs out. Singaporean scientists have unveiled a smart microchip that will keep running long after its battery runs empty. The new BAYLESS has an integrated solar cell that can get power from dim lighting, and its power management features let it start and run itself. The new chip will be installed on the Internet of Things (IoT) sensor nodes. Because it needs far less power, it can run on much smaller batteries. Smart devices that will use the chip can be made many times cheaper and smaller. IoT devices need to run for long periods of time on limited power. They, therefore, need to be very efficient. The batteries in a typical smart device are much bigger than the lone microchip they power. A battery can also cost thrice as much as the chip. The size of the battery depends on the operational life of the sensor node. The node’s lifespan also determines how often the battery needs to be replaced. Most IoT devices constantly use battery power. Smaller batteries are replaced more often, while bigger batteries cost more and take up more space. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
New giant drones are strong enough to perform jobs such as cleaning wind turbines, fighting fires and even carrying people to safety. Some of the dirtiest, most dangerous jobs are being taken over by artificial intelligence, robots, and drones. Machines are slowly becoming man’s best friend, helping us do tough, risky, or menial tasks. Future drones will do more than just peruse the skies, surveying and filming. New innovations in drone technology show their potential to take on much larger tasks that benefit society in new ways. New giant drones are now capable of cleaning wind turbines, fighting fires, and even carrying people to safety. An innovative startup, Aeron, has built a giant drone equipped with 28 motors and 16 batteries. The stout prototypes can lift up to 400 pounds, potentially rescuing people from burning buildings. In a series of videos, the founders demonstrate how the new drones can manoeuvre with hoses to clean and de-ice wind turbines. These large quadcopters can manoeuvre alongside tall buildings, clean the windows, or put out a potential fire.The ambitious startup, backed by Y Combinator, is already getting orders from around the world to help clean and de-ice wind turbines. The greatest challenge for these new drones is sustaining power. Relying on battery only, these drones can only carry a load for about twelve minutes. For now, the drones are better off tethered and connected to a power source from the ground. As the capability of drones expands, the implications for abuse become more real, too. A drone that can rescue people from fires can also identify, locate, and displace a person for various reasons. Large drones of this nature could be used to protect property, locating and removing threats from private areas. Who will make the rules that govern how drones can and cannot be used? A large drone that fights fires can also fight insurrection, threaten protestors, or spray down mobs. In the eyes of authority, this could be seen as a good use for drones, to curb violence; however, the power could readily be abused. Government forces could use drones in an authoritarian, intimidating manner, threatening peaceful assembly, free speech, and democracy. Drones equipped with tear gas could help riot police disperse their opposition. Large drones could easily be used as a means of force to control others. (Related: Drone makers looking to expand into civilian law enforcement market as a replacement for police helicopters.) A giant drone that can operate hoses to clean wind turbines also has the capability to operate hoses to fumigate from overhead. If a city council declared that a vector-borne disease was threatening their community, they could deploy these large drones overhead to fumigate mosquitoes and ticks in certain areas. The residents of the city will have no control over the operation or the number of nervous system toxins that are being sprayed into the air. That same drone could be used to spray disinfectants over an area that has been declared an outbreak zone. Health officials, paying no mind to the consequences of spraying people with biological agents and other chemicals, could experiment with airborne flu vaccines to combat a declared flu outbreak. As drone capabilities expand, it won’t be long before authorities begin using the technology to their advantage. It will be much easier for authorities to carry out force if they can hide behind the technology. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore.
Sprawling Wheel Leg Robot Crawls and Climbs. The latest version of this skittery little sprawling robot can crawl like a turtle. We’re always impressed by the way David Zarrouk (a professor at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev by way of UC Berkeley’s Biomimetic Mill systems Lab) manages to extract a ton of functionality from the absolute minimum of hardware in his robots. In the past, we’ve seen clever designs like a steerable robot that only uses a single motor and a multi-jointed robot arm that uses a travelling motor to actuate all of its degrees of freedom. At the 2018 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) in Brisbane, Zarrouk presented an update to STAR, the Sprawl-Tuned Autonomous Robot that we first wrote about in 2013. Called Rising STAR, or RSTAR, it takes the sprawling wheel-leg mobility and adds another degree of freedom that allows the body of the robot to move separately from the legs, changing its centre of mass to help it climb over obstacles. RSTAR is the latest in Zarrouk’s series of sprawling robots, designed to handle all kinds of terrain obstacles while minimizing the cost of transport. “Sprawl” in this context refers to the robot’s legs, which are angled (adjustably) downwards and outwards from the body. RSTAR has an added degree of freedom in that its body is able to change its location relative to the legs, altering the robot’s centre of mass. It seems like a simple change, but it enables a bunch of new behaviours—not only can the robot climb over larger obstacles without flipping over, but it can also climb vertically up closely spaced walls and “crawl” through narrow gaps by adopting a legged walking gait. While the adjustable centre of mass helps keep the robot more stable, as the video shows flipping over can actually be useful, since it enables the robot to switch between faster and more efficient round wheels and more capable spoke wheels (whegs). RSTAR’s top speed is about 1 m/s on hard flat surfaces, although its turtle gait means that it can handle extremely soft or granular surfaces (like thick mud or sand) without getting stuck. Content gathered by BTM robotics training centre, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP Nagar, robotics training centres in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centres in JP Nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
Robots will never replace teachers but can boost children's education. Scientists say social robots are proving effective in the teaching of certain narrow subjects, such as vocabulary or prime numbers. But current technical limitations -- particularly around speech recognition and the ability for social interaction -- mean their role will largely be confined to that of teaching assistants or tutors, at least for the foreseeable future. The study was led by Professor in Robotics Tony Belpaeme, from the University of Plymouth and Ghent University, who has worked in the field of social robotics for around two decades. He said: "In recent years scientists have started to build robots for the classroom -- not the robot kits used to learn about technology and mathematics, but social robots that can actually teach. This is because pressures on teaching budgets, and calls for more personalized teaching, have led to a search for technological solutions. "In the broadest sense, social robots have the potential to become part of the educational infrastructure just like paper, white boards, and computer tablets. But a social robot has the potential to support and challenge students in ways unavailable in current resource-limited educational environments. Robots can free up precious time for teachers, allowing the teacher to focus on what people still do best -- provide a comprehensive, empathic, and rewarding educational experience." The current study, compiled in conjunction with academics at Yale University and the University of Tsukuba, involved a review of more than 100 published articles, which have shown robots to be effective at increasing outcomes, largely because of their physical presence. However it also explored in detail some of the technical constraints highlighting that speech recognition, for example, is still insufficiently robust to allow the robot to understand spoken utterances from young children. It also says that introducing social robots into the school curriculum would pose significant logistical challenges and might in fact carry risks, with some children being seen to rely too heavily on the help offered by robots rather than simply using them when they are in difficulty. In their conclusion, the authors add: "Next to the practical considerations of introducing robots in education, there are also ethical issues. How far do we want the education of our children to be delegated to machines? Overall, learners are positive about their experiences, but parents and teaching staff adopt a more cautious attitude. "Notwithstanding that, robots show great promise when teaching restricted topics with the effects almost matching those of human tutoring. So although the use of robots in educational settings is limited by technical and logistical challenges for now, it are highly likely that classrooms of the future will feature robots that assist a human teacher." Content gathered by BTM robotics training centre, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem educationin JP Nagar, robotics training centres in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centres in JP Nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore.
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