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Flying Dragon Robot Transforms Itself to Squeeze Through Gaps. Dragon can change its shape to move through complex environments and even manipulate objects. There’s been a lot of recent focus on applications for aerial robots, and one of the areas with the most potential is indoors. The thing about indoors is that by definition you have to go through doors to get there, and once you’re inside, there are all kinds of things that are horribly dangerous to aerial robots, like more doors, walls, windows, people, furniture, hanging plants, lampshades, and other aerial robots, inevitably followed by still more doors. One solution is to make your robots super small, so that they can fit through small openings without running into something fragile and expensive, but then you’re stuck with small robots that can’t do a whole heck of a lot. Another solution is to put your robots in protective cages, but then you’re stuck with robots that can’t as easily interact with their environment, even if they want to. Ideally, you’d want a robot that doesn’t need that level of protection, that’s somehow large and powerful but also small and nimble at the same time. At JSK Lab at the University of Tokyo, roboticists have developed a robot called DRAGON, which (obviously) stands for for “Dual-rotor embedded multilink Robot with the Ability of multi-degree-of-freedom aerial transformation.” It’s a modular flying robot powered by ducted fans that can transform literally on the fly, from a square to a snake to anything in between, allowing it to stretch out to pass through small holes and then make whatever other shape you want once it’s on the other side. DRAGON is made of a series of linked modules, each of which consists of a pair of ducted fan thrusters that can be actuated in roll and pitch to vector thrust in just about any direction you need. The modules are connected to one another with a powered hinged joint, and the whole robot is driven by an Intel Euclid and powered by a battery pack (providing 3 minutes of flight time, which is honestly more than I would have thought), mounted along the robot’s spine. This particular prototype is made up of four modules, allowing it to behave sort of like a quad rotor, even though I suppose technically it’s an octorotor. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
AI robots being fitted with special software that lets them adapt to injury like animals. It’s hard to believe that there once was a time when highly advanced robots only existed in Hollywood movies and comic books. Now, technology has reached a point where robots can do many things that human beings can do – in some cases, the two are even indistinguishable. An essay published in the International Journal of Science described an algorithm that has been specifically designed to allow robots to adapt to damage and ultimately reduce fragility. “Here we introduce an intelligent trial-and-error algorithm that allows robots to adapt to damage in less than two minutes in large search spaces without requiring self-diagnosis or pre-specified contingency plans, ” wrote the essay’s authors, Antoine Cully, Jeff Clune, Danesh Tarapore and Jean-Baptiste Mouret. Content gathered by BTM robotics training centre, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP Nagar, robotics training centres in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centres in JP Nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore.
Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gestures Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory system enable people to correct robot mistakes on multiple-choice tasks. Getting robots to do things isn’t easy, usually, scientists have to either explicitly program them or get them to understand how humans communicate via language. But what if we could control robots more intuitively, using just hand gestures and brainwaves? A new system spearheaded by researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) aims to do exactly that, allowing users to instantly correct robot mistakes with nothing more than brain signals and the flick of a finger. Building off the team’s past work focused on simple binary-choice activities, the new work expands the scope to multiple-choice tasks, opening up new possibilities for how human workers could manage teams of robots. By monitoring brain activity, the system can detect in real-time if a person notices an error as a robot does a task. Using an interface that measures muscle activity, the person can then make hand gestures to scroll through and select the correct option for the robot to execute. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
Nvidia is training robots to learn new skills by observing humans. Initial experiments with the process have seen a Baxter robot learn to pick up and move colored boxes and a toy car in a lab environment. The researchers hope the development of the new deep-learning based system will go some way to train robots to work alongside humans in both manufacturing and home settings. “In the manufacturing environment, robots are really good at repeatedly executing the same trajectory over and over again, but they don’t adapt to changes in the environment, and they don’t learn their tasks, ” Nvidia principal research scientist Stan Birchfield told VentureBeat. “So to repurpose a robot to execute a new task, you have to bring in an expert to reprogram the robot at a fairly low level, and it’s an expensive operation. What we’re interested in doing is making it easier for a non-expert user to teach a robot a new task by simply showing it what to do.” The researchers trained a sequence of neural networks to perform duties associated with perception, program generation, and program execution. The result was that the robot was able to learn a new task from a single demonstration in the real world. Once the robot witnesses the task, it generates a human-readable description of the states required to complete the task. A human can then correct the steps if necessary before execution on the real robot. “There’s sort of a paradigm shift happening in the robotics community now, ” Birchfield said. “We’re at the point now where we can use GPUs to generate essentially a limitless amount of pre-labeled data essentially for free to develop and test algorithms. And this is potentially going to allow us to develop these robotics systems that need to learn how to interact with the world around them in ways that scale better and are safer.” In a video released by the researchers, human operator shows a pair of stacks of cubes to the robot. The system then understands an appropriate program and correctly places the cubes in the correct order. Information gathered by - Robotics for u. Bangalore Robotics, BTM Robotics training center, Robotics spares, Bannerghatta Robotics training center, best robotics training in bangalore,
Look, up in the sky! It's Disney's new autonomous acrobatic robot. Disney's animatronics are coming a long way from drunken pirates waving flagons of ale or hippos that wiggle their ears. In the (relatively) near future, robotic versions of Iron Man or Buzz Lightyear could be performing autonomous acrobatics overhead in Disney theme parks, thanks to the newly-unveiled Stuntronics robot. Animatronic characters have populated Disney parks for more than half a century, albeit often just looping a specific movement over and over. In recent years Disney Research has tried to make the robots more agile and interactive, developing versions that can grab objects more naturally and even juggle and play catch with visitors. Back in May, the company unveiled a prototype called Stickman. Basically a mechanical stick with two degrees of freedom, the robot could be flicked into the air like a trapeze artist, where it used a suite of sensors to tuck and roll in midair, perform a couple of backflips, and unfurl for landing. Impressive as that is, Stickman was far more stick than man. In just a few short months, the project has evolved into Stuntronics, a robot that's noticeably more human. Designed to be a kind of robotic stunt double for a human actor, the Stuntronics robot can perform the same kind of autonomous aerial stunts thanks to a similar load of sensors as Stickman, including an accelerometer, gyroscope array and laser range finding. But unlike Stickman, Stuntronics can stick its landing too. The former bot tended to land flat on its back, but the new version can land feet-first, and hit what looks like a smaller target. Not only that, it can strike a heroic pose in the air, before tucking back up ready for landing. Disney Research scientists said that during a stage show or ride, other animatronics or human actors could perform the up-close, static scenes before the Stuntronics robot is wheeled out when the character needs to fly (or fall with style). Of course, there's no guarantee that this kind of thing will ever get off the ground (literally or figuratively), but it's always exciting to peek behind the curtain at Disneyland. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
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