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Ex-NASA Engineer Made the Perfect Rock Skipping Robot Ex-NASA engineer and YouTube inventor Mark Rober have made a perfect rock-skipping robot. Not only can the robot perform impressively, but it can help you learn how to skip rocks better too. Rober built the robot by tweaking a clay pigeon thrower, creating wooden custom throwing arms and a base for stability. Once he built a prototype, his team of assistants (nieces and nephews) gave Skippa, the rock-throwing robot makeover with spray paint and giant googly eyes, and then brainstormed test variables for a perfect skip. How do you achieve the perfect rock skip? The team narrowed it down to four variables: the wrist angle of the robot (the angle of the rock relative to the water), the arm angle of the robot (which changes the path of the rock), and the rocks used (variations in diameter and thickness). To create uniform controls for robot tests, Rober and his team made their own rocks out of unfired clay (the clay discs easily dried in the sun, and dissolved in water under 30 mins). After the robot tested some unsuccessful skips, it began to shoot rocks tumbling across the water in over 60 skips per throw. Here’s the recipe Rober finally found for the perfect rock skip: the rock should hit at a 20-degree angle to the water, with a 20-degree path, and a higher throw for more energy. Flicking the wrist as much as possible will help the rock spin, which will help the rock stable. And finally, the most important factors for rock selection is a flat bottom and finding a rock that’s heavy but not too big to handle. When Rober’s amateur engineering team tested the principles they learned from the robot, they were quickly able to improve their skips from an average of three to 16 skips. Content gathered by BTM robotics training centre, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP Nagar, robotics training centres in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centres in JP Nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore.
Firefighting Robot Snake Flies on Jets of Water. Using steerable jets of water like rockets, this robot snake can fly into burning buildings to extinguish fires. Fires have an unfortunate habit of happening in places that aren’t necessarily easy to reach. Whether the source of the fire is somewhere deep within a building, or up more than a floor or two, or both, firefighters have few good options for tackling them. They can either pour water into windows (which doesn’t always work that well), or they can try and get into the building, which seems like it’s probably super dangerous. At the International Conference on Robotics and Automation last month, researchers from Tohoku University and National Institute of Technology, Hachinohe College, in Japan, presented a new kind of snake-like robot with the body of a fire house. Like other snake robots, this one has the potential to be able to wiggle its way into windows or other gaps in a structure, with the benefit of carrying and directing water as it goes. What’s so cool about this particular design, though, is how it powers itself: By firing high pressure jets of water downwards like rocket engines, it can lift itself off of the ground and fly. What’s happening here might be complex to implement in practice, but in principle, it’s not too complicated: There are sets of steerable nozzle modules distributed along the length of the hose. These modules siphon water out of the high pressure stream inside of the hose, and spray it downwards. As the water exits downwards at high velocity, it pushes the hose upwards, and with enough of these modules squirting out high pressure water, the entire hose can be lifted into the air. Just like a rocket, it’s not dependent on ground proximity to work, so as long as you keep on giving it more hose and water at a high enough pressure, it’ll go as high as you want. Since the nozzles are steerable, each module can direct itself independently, letting the hose weave itself through small gaps deep into a structure in order to find the source of a fire. And the “head” module comes with a few extra degrees of freedom to allow the water stream to be directed more precisely. And of course, while the head nozzle is fighting the source of the fire, a byproduct of the body of the house keeping itself airborne is that it’s drenching everything that it’s passing over, while also keeping itself cool. The 2-meter long prototype in the video above is intended to be a single segment in a robot that can be extended to an arbitrary length by just adding on more segments. A gas engine powered a compressor that provided water at 0.7 MPa. It worked reasonably well, as prototypes go, but it’s really more of a proof of concept in hardware than anything else, and obviously there’s a lot to do before a system like this could be real-world useful. The researchers readily admit that their current control algorithms are “not sophisticated, ” and that they’ll need to put some work into making it more stable, more controllable, and able to handle more modules. They’re actively working on it, though, and we’re looking forward to this tech being adapted to garden hoses as well. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
Experimental drone uses AI to spot violence in crowds. Whether or not it works well in practice is another story. Drone-based surveillance still makes many people uncomfortable, but that isn't stopping research into more effective airborne watchdogs. Scientists have developed an experimental drone system that uses AI to detect violent actions in crowds. The team trained their machine learning algorithm to recognize a handful of typical violent motions (punching, kicking, shooting and stabbing) and flag them when they appear in a drone's camera view. The technology could theoretically detect a brawl that on-the-ground officers might miss, or pinpoint the source of a gunshot. As The Verge warned, the technology definitely isn't ready for real-world use. The researchers used volunteers in relatively ideal conditions (open ground, generous spacing and dramatic movements). The AI is 94 percent effective at its best, but that drops down to an unacceptable 79 percent when there are ten people in the scene. As-is, this system might struggle to find an assailant on a jam-packed street -- what if it mistakes an innocent gesture for an attack? The creators expect to fly their drone system over two festivals in India as a test, but it's not something you'd want to rely on just yet. There's a larger problem surrounding the ethical implications. There are questions about abuses of power and reliability for facial recognition systems. Governments may be tempted to use this as an excuse to record aerial footage of people in public spaces, and could track the gestures of political dissidents (say, people holding protest signs or flashing peace symbols). It could easily combine with other surveillance methods to create a complete picture of a person's movements. This might only find acceptance in limited scenarios where organizations both make it clear that people are on camera and with reassurances that a handshake won't lead to police at their door. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore.
Look, up in the sky! It's Disney's new autonomous acrobatic robot. Disney's animatronics are coming a long way from drunken pirates waving flagons of ale or hippos that wiggle their ears. In the (relatively) near future, robotic versions of Iron Man or Buzz Lightyear could be performing autonomous acrobatics overhead in Disney theme parks, thanks to the newly-unveiled Stuntronics robot. Animatronic characters have populated Disney parks for more than half a century, albeit often just looping a specific movement over and over. In recent years Disney Research has tried to make the robots more agile and interactive, developing versions that can grab objects more naturally and even juggle and play catch with visitors. Back in May, the company unveiled a prototype called Stickman. Basically a mechanical stick with two degrees of freedom, the robot could be flicked into the air like a trapeze artist, where it used a suite of sensors to tuck and roll in midair, perform a couple of backflips, and unfurl for landing. Impressive as that is, Stickman was far more stick than man. In just a few short months, the project has evolved into Stuntronics, a robot that's noticeably more human. Designed to be a kind of robotic stunt double for a human actor, the Stuntronics robot can perform the same kind of autonomous aerial stunts thanks to a similar load of sensors as Stickman, including an accelerometer, gyroscope array and laser range finding. But unlike Stickman, Stuntronics can stick its landing too. The former bot tended to land flat on its back, but the new version can land feet-first, and hit what looks like a smaller target. Not only that, it can strike a heroic pose in the air, before tucking back up ready for landing. Disney Research scientists said that during a stage show or ride, other animatronics or human actors could perform the up-close, static scenes before the Stuntronics robot is wheeled out when the character needs to fly (or fall with style). Of course, there's no guarantee that this kind of thing will ever get off the ground (literally or figuratively), but it's always exciting to peek behind the curtain at Disneyland. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
SAY HI TO CIMON, THE FIRST AI-POWERED ROBOT TO FLY IN SPACE. When you thought that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is redefining life on Earth, think again! Meet CIMON, the first AI-powered robot who was launched into space from Florida on Friday, June 29th to join the crew and assist astronauts of the International Space Station (ISS). CIMON was launched by a SpaceX rocket carrying food and supplies for the crew aboard the International Space Station. At CIMON’s pre-launch news conference, Kirk Shireman, NASA’s International Space Station (ISS) program manager, addressed that the knowledge base and ability to tap into AI in a way that is useful for the task that is done is really critical for having humans further and further away from the planet. CIMON or (Crew Interactive Mobile Companion) is programmed to answer voice commands in English. The AI-powered robot is roughly the size of a volleyball and weighs 5 kilograms. CIMON will float through the zero-gravity environment of the space station to research a database of information about the ISS. In addition to the mechanical tasks assigned, the AI-powered CIMON can even assess the moods of its human crewmates at the ISS and interact accordingly with them. An Intelligent Astronaut CIMON is the brainchild of the European aerospace company Airbus. With the artificial intelligence inside powered by IBM, AI-Powered CIMON was initially built for the German space agency. Alexander Gerst, a German astronaut currently aboard the ISS, assisted with the design of CIMON’s screen prompts and vocal controls. As per the mission description written by Airbus representatives, CIMON’s mission calls for the AI-Powered astronaut robot to work with Gerst on three separate investigations. Cimon’s tasks at ISS include experimenting with crystals, working together with Gerst to solve the Rubik’s cube and performing a complex medical experiment using itself as an ‘intelligent’ flying camera. CIMON can interact with anyone at ISS; the AI-powered robot will nod when any command is spoken in English. However, CIMON is programmed to specifically help Gerst during its first stay on the ISS. Alexander Gerst can make CIMON work by speaking commands in English like, ‘CIMON, could you please help me perform a certain experiment? or could you please help me with the procedure?'” In response, CIMON will fly towards Alexander Gerst, to start the communication. An Interactive Step Forward CIMON knows whom it is talking to through its inbuilt facial-recognition software. If you thought that CIMON would look like a mechanical robot, you are wrong. CIMON has a face of its own, a white screen with a smiley face. The astronaut AI assistant will be able to float around, by sucking air in and expelling it out through its special tubes once it is aboard the ISS. CIMON’s mission to space demonstrates researchers, the collaboration of humans and AI-powered technology for further explorations. However, it will be a long way before intelligent robots are ready to undertake principal tasks in the final frontier including helping astronauts repair damaged spacecraft systems or treating sick crewmembers. But a beginning has been made with CIMON and that day will probably be a reality soon. In its first space mission, CIMON will stay in space for a few months and is scheduled to return to earth in December. Post its return, scientists will study and assess its abilities for future implementations. With the launch of CIMON, a lifelong space-exploration association between humans and machine may have just begun. Content gathered by BTM robotics training centre, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP Nagar, robotics training centres in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centres in JP Nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore.
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