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Flying Dragon Robot Transforms Itself to Squeeze Through Gaps. Dragon can change its shape to move through complex environments and even manipulate objects. There’s been a lot of recent focus on applications for aerial robots, and one of the areas with the most potential is indoors. The thing about indoors is that by definition you have to go through doors to get there, and once you’re inside, there are all kinds of things that are horribly dangerous to aerial robots, like more doors, walls, windows, people, furniture, hanging plants, lampshades, and other aerial robots, inevitably followed by still more doors. One solution is to make your robots super small, so that they can fit through small openings without running into something fragile and expensive, but then you’re stuck with small robots that can’t do a whole heck of a lot. Another solution is to put your robots in protective cages, but then you’re stuck with robots that can’t as easily interact with their environment, even if they want to. Ideally, you’d want a robot that doesn’t need that level of protection, that’s somehow large and powerful but also small and nimble at the same time. At JSK Lab at the University of Tokyo, roboticists have developed a robot called DRAGON, which (obviously) stands for for “Dual-rotor embedded multilink Robot with the Ability of multi-degree-of-freedom aerial transformation.” It’s a modular flying robot powered by ducted fans that can transform literally on the fly, from a square to a snake to anything in between, allowing it to stretch out to pass through small holes and then make whatever other shape you want once it’s on the other side. DRAGON is made of a series of linked modules, each of which consists of a pair of ducted fan thrusters that can be actuated in roll and pitch to vector thrust in just about any direction you need. The modules are connected to one another with a powered hinged joint, and the whole robot is driven by an Intel Euclid and powered by a battery pack (providing 3 minutes of flight time, which is honestly more than I would have thought), mounted along the robot’s spine. This particular prototype is made up of four modules, allowing it to behave sort of like a quad rotor, even though I suppose technically it’s an octorotor. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
AI robots being fitted with special software that lets them adapt to injury like animals. It’s hard to believe that there once was a time when highly advanced robots only existed in Hollywood movies and comic books. Now, technology has reached a point where robots can do many things that human beings can do – in some cases, the two are even indistinguishable. An essay published in the International Journal of Science described an algorithm that has been specifically designed to allow robots to adapt to damage and ultimately reduce fragility. “Here we introduce an intelligent trial-and-error algorithm that allows robots to adapt to damage in less than two minutes in large search spaces without requiring self-diagnosis or pre-specified contingency plans, ” wrote the essay’s authors, Antoine Cully, Jeff Clune, Danesh Tarapore and Jean-Baptiste Mouret. Content gathered by BTM robotics training centre, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP Nagar, robotics training centres in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centres in JP Nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore.
Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gestures Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory system enable people to correct robot mistakes on multiple-choice tasks. Getting robots to do things isn’t easy, usually, scientists have to either explicitly program them or get them to understand how humans communicate via language. But what if we could control robots more intuitively, using just hand gestures and brainwaves? A new system spearheaded by researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) aims to do exactly that, allowing users to instantly correct robot mistakes with nothing more than brain signals and the flick of a finger. Building off the team’s past work focused on simple binary-choice activities, the new work expands the scope to multiple-choice tasks, opening up new possibilities for how human workers could manage teams of robots. By monitoring brain activity, the system can detect in real-time if a person notices an error as a robot does a task. Using an interface that measures muscle activity, the person can then make hand gestures to scroll through and select the correct option for the robot to execute. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
Nvidia is training robots to learn new skills by observing humans. Initial experiments with the process have seen a Baxter robot learn to pick up and move colored boxes and a toy car in a lab environment. The researchers hope the development of the new deep-learning based system will go some way to train robots to work alongside humans in both manufacturing and home settings. “In the manufacturing environment, robots are really good at repeatedly executing the same trajectory over and over again, but they don’t adapt to changes in the environment, and they don’t learn their tasks, ” Nvidia principal research scientist Stan Birchfield told VentureBeat. “So to repurpose a robot to execute a new task, you have to bring in an expert to reprogram the robot at a fairly low level, and it’s an expensive operation. What we’re interested in doing is making it easier for a non-expert user to teach a robot a new task by simply showing it what to do.” The researchers trained a sequence of neural networks to perform duties associated with perception, program generation, and program execution. The result was that the robot was able to learn a new task from a single demonstration in the real world. Once the robot witnesses the task, it generates a human-readable description of the states required to complete the task. A human can then correct the steps if necessary before execution on the real robot. “There’s sort of a paradigm shift happening in the robotics community now, ” Birchfield said. “We’re at the point now where we can use GPUs to generate essentially a limitless amount of pre-labeled data essentially for free to develop and test algorithms. And this is potentially going to allow us to develop these robotics systems that need to learn how to interact with the world around them in ways that scale better and are safer.” In a video released by the researchers, human operator shows a pair of stacks of cubes to the robot. The system then understands an appropriate program and correctly places the cubes in the correct order. Information gathered by - Robotics for u. Bangalore Robotics, BTM Robotics training center, Robotics spares, Bannerghatta Robotics training center, best robotics training in bangalore,
By 2023, India wants an advanced robotic soldier protecting its borders. This next-generation soldier should be intelligent enough to automatically recognize threats and take action. It should also be sophisticated enough to distinguish between threats and non-threats. If India achieves its objective, that will have a huge impact on two fronts at least. First, the robotic soldier would give India the ability to redefine geopolitics, regionally and globally. India could join a very small yet special club of countries (such as Russia and Israel) that are using robots to defend their borders. India may use its robotic soldier as a strategic weapon, like a nuclear bomb, to command attention and respect. From a nation that is currently a secondary partner to the U.S., Russia, or China, a robotic soldier would give India the capability to have a strategic agenda of its own. India will not just be a coalition partner. It will create its own coalition. The next U.N. peacekeeping mission might involve robotic soldiers imported from India or under the command of an Indian general experienced in commanding a robotic army. Second, building an army of robotic soldiers would affect the Indian economy. During the next financial year (2016-’17), India plans to spend nearly $40 billion on defense. This expenditure has quadrupled in the past 15 years. The expenditure was $11.8 billion in 2001. By 2022, India may be spending $620 billion on defense. It’s no wonder then that the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) found India topping the list of nations importing weapons. According to SIPRI, India bought 14% of all weapons sold globally between 2011 and 2015. The defense budget not only accounts for 17.2 percent of the total planned government expenditure for the next fiscal year, but there is also an off-books number — pensions of defense personnel — that is rising rapidly. It will be around $10 billion in the next financial year. When one in five rupees is going toward defense operations, the economy takes a hit. While the robotic soldiers will not fix the problem by themselves or dramatically change the budget, they are likely to offer relief. Every rupee saved from defense will go toward development. What strategy will India adopt? Will it increase its imports of weapons and acquire the robotic soldiers from overseas, or will India create its robotic soldiers under the “Make in India” program? Or, just as Russia surprised the world with its intervention in the Syrian civil war, India could also enter and exit hot zones or create them in pursuit of its national interests. The robotic soldier would change the border dynamics with China, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, for sure. Information gathered by - Bangalore BTM Robotics training center, Bannerghatta Robotics training center.
Researchers build a self-healing 'robot skin'. Puncture a hole, and the alloy will fill in the gap. Most conventional androids are fairly rigid, susceptible to damage and difficult to repair. However, scientists are determined to (literally) give them thicker skins. They've experimented with soft, deformable circuits that are flexible, and could reduce business expenses in the long term -- but are still prone to tearing and puncturing. The solution to these issues may lie in one recent advancement. A group of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University have found a way to counter surface damage and electrical failure commonly observed in soft materials used in engineering robotic electronics. Like previous efforts, it involves a certain kind of polymer. To create a material that is both flexible and resistant to damage, Carmel Majidi and his team inserted liquid micro droplets of a gallium-indium based metal alloy into a soft, elastomer shell. Essentially, it's a solid-liquid hybrid that is stretchable, electrically insulating and capable of auto-repair even when damaged multiple times. Where most other self-healing soft electronics need exposure to heat, increased humidity or manual reassembly to get back to health, the metal-elastomer composite heals itself by forming new electrical pathways. Majidi says the inspiration behind the composite material comes from the nervous system's ability to regenerate itself. It isn't mimicking neuroplasticity entirely, though; while the metal-elastomer could be useful in wearable computing and inflatable airships to protect electrical wiring from potential damage, there's no such protection for mechanical or structural damage. That's the eventual aim -- creating a material which helps robots weather both electrical and structural defects and, like Astro Boy, interact with humans more safely. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore.
Look, up in the sky! It's Disney's new autonomous acrobatic robot. Disney's animatronics are coming a long way from drunken pirates waving flagons of ale or hippos that wiggle their ears. In the (relatively) near future, robotic versions of Iron Man or Buzz Lightyear could be performing autonomous acrobatics overhead in Disney theme parks, thanks to the newly-unveiled Stuntronics robot. Animatronic characters have populated Disney parks for more than half a century, albeit often just looping a specific movement over and over. In recent years Disney Research has tried to make the robots more agile and interactive, developing versions that can grab objects more naturally and even juggle and play catch with visitors. Back in May, the company unveiled a prototype called Stickman. Basically a mechanical stick with two degrees of freedom, the robot could be flicked into the air like a trapeze artist, where it used a suite of sensors to tuck and roll in midair, perform a couple of backflips, and unfurl for landing. Impressive as that is, Stickman was far more stick than man. In just a few short months, the project has evolved into Stuntronics, a robot that's noticeably more human. Designed to be a kind of robotic stunt double for a human actor, the Stuntronics robot can perform the same kind of autonomous aerial stunts thanks to a similar load of sensors as Stickman, including an accelerometer, gyroscope array and laser range finding. But unlike Stickman, Stuntronics can stick its landing too. The former bot tended to land flat on its back, but the new version can land feet-first, and hit what looks like a smaller target. Not only that, it can strike a heroic pose in the air, before tucking back up ready for landing. Disney Research scientists said that during a stage show or ride, other animatronics or human actors could perform the up-close, static scenes before the Stuntronics robot is wheeled out when the character needs to fly (or fall with style). Of course, there's no guarantee that this kind of thing will ever get off the ground (literally or figuratively), but it's always exciting to peek behind the curtain at Disneyland. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
This Sand Printing Robot Is What You Need If You're Stranded on a Desert Island. If you're looking to advertise at the beach but all the planes have been booked, or you're stranded on a desert island, Ivan Miranda has a new robot for you. His sand drawing robot can print any sort of text on the beach. It's a strong improvement over a finger in the sand. The text looks a lot like a dot matrix format from the 60s and 70s, and that's for a good reason. Miranda is using a large linear actuator on large wheels, slowly moving one column at a time. It writes vertically, making indentations in the sand with a marker that drops up and picks up to fit each letter. The skinny columns give each letter maximum visibility. The tradeoff is speed. Much of the video is spent on fast forward, speeding up what appears to be a time consuming process. That could present some trouble on a beach, where wind (or other beachgoers) might erase a message before it’s written. But as Miranda says in the video, this is his first real trial with the sand writing bot. Now that the first iteration is finished, speed can come with future models. At a time where fewer and fewer people handwrite, robots are becoming experts. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore.
Firefighting Robot Snake Flies on Jets of Water. Using steerable jets of water like rockets, this robot snake can fly into burning buildings to extinguish fires. Fires have an unfortunate habit of happening in places that aren’t necessarily easy to reach. Whether the source of the fire is somewhere deep within a building, or up more than a floor or two, or both, firefighters have few good options for tackling them. They can either pour water into windows (which doesn’t always work that well), or they can try and get into the building, which seems like it’s probably super dangerous. At the International Conference on Robotics and Automation last month, researchers from Tohoku University and National Institute of Technology, Hachinohe College, in Japan, presented a new kind of snake-like robot with the body of a fire house. Like other snake robots, this one has the potential to be able to wiggle its way into windows or other gaps in a structure, with the benefit of carrying and directing water as it goes. What’s so cool about this particular design, though, is how it powers itself: By firing high pressure jets of water downwards like rocket engines, it can lift itself off of the ground and fly. What’s happening here might be complex to implement in practice, but in principle, it’s not too complicated: There are sets of steerable nozzle modules distributed along the length of the hose. These modules siphon water out of the high pressure stream inside of the hose, and spray it downwards. As the water exits downwards at high velocity, it pushes the hose upwards, and with enough of these modules squirting out high pressure water, the entire hose can be lifted into the air. Just like a rocket, it’s not dependent on ground proximity to work, so as long as you keep on giving it more hose and water at a high enough pressure, it’ll go as high as you want. Since the nozzles are steerable, each module can direct itself independently, letting the hose weave itself through small gaps deep into a structure in order to find the source of a fire. And the “head” module comes with a few extra degrees of freedom to allow the water stream to be directed more precisely. And of course, while the head nozzle is fighting the source of the fire, a byproduct of the body of the house keeping itself airborne is that it’s drenching everything that it’s passing over, while also keeping itself cool. The 2-meter long prototype in the video above is intended to be a single segment in a robot that can be extended to an arbitrary length by just adding on more segments. A gas engine powered a compressor that provided water at 0.7 MPa. It worked reasonably well, as prototypes go, but it’s really more of a proof of concept in hardware than anything else, and obviously there’s a lot to do before a system like this could be real-world useful. The researchers readily admit that their current control algorithms are “not sophisticated, ” and that they’ll need to put some work into making it more stable, more controllable, and able to handle more modules. They’re actively working on it, though, and we’re looking forward to this tech being adapted to garden hoses as well. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
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