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By 2023, India wants an advanced robotic soldier protecting its borders. This next-generation soldier should be intelligent enough to automatically recognize threats and take action. It should also be sophisticated enough to distinguish between threats and non-threats. If India achieves its objective, that will have a huge impact on two fronts at least. First, the robotic soldier would give India the ability to redefine geopolitics, regionally and globally. India could join a very small yet special club of countries (such as Russia and Israel) that are using robots to defend their borders. India may use its robotic soldier as a strategic weapon, like a nuclear bomb, to command attention and respect. From a nation that is currently a secondary partner to the U.S., Russia, or China, a robotic soldier would give India the capability to have a strategic agenda of its own. India will not just be a coalition partner. It will create its own coalition. The next U.N. peacekeeping mission might involve robotic soldiers imported from India or under the command of an Indian general experienced in commanding a robotic army. Second, building an army of robotic soldiers would affect the Indian economy. During the next financial year (2016-’17), India plans to spend nearly $40 billion on defense. This expenditure has quadrupled in the past 15 years. The expenditure was $11.8 billion in 2001. By 2022, India may be spending $620 billion on defense. It’s no wonder then that the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) found India topping the list of nations importing weapons. According to SIPRI, India bought 14% of all weapons sold globally between 2011 and 2015. The defense budget not only accounts for 17.2 percent of the total planned government expenditure for the next fiscal year, but there is also an off-books number — pensions of defense personnel — that is rising rapidly. It will be around $10 billion in the next financial year. When one in five rupees is going toward defense operations, the economy takes a hit. While the robotic soldiers will not fix the problem by themselves or dramatically change the budget, they are likely to offer relief. Every rupee saved from defense will go toward development. What strategy will India adopt? Will it increase its imports of weapons and acquire the robotic soldiers from overseas, or will India create its robotic soldiers under the “Make in India” program? Or, just as Russia surprised the world with its intervention in the Syrian civil war, India could also enter and exit hot zones or create them in pursuit of its national interests. The robotic soldier would change the border dynamics with China, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, for sure. Information gathered by - Bangalore BTM Robotics training center, Bannerghatta Robotics training center.
Experimental drone uses AI to spot violence in crowds. Whether or not it works well in practice is another story. Drone-based surveillance still makes many people uncomfortable, but that isn't stopping research into more effective airborne watchdogs. Scientists have developed an experimental drone system that uses AI to detect violent actions in crowds. The team trained their machine learning algorithm to recognize a handful of typical violent motions (punching, kicking, shooting and stabbing) and flag them when they appear in a drone's camera view. The technology could theoretically detect a brawl that on-the-ground officers might miss, or pinpoint the source of a gunshot. As The Verge warned, the technology definitely isn't ready for real-world use. The researchers used volunteers in relatively ideal conditions (open ground, generous spacing and dramatic movements). The AI is 94 percent effective at its best, but that drops down to an unacceptable 79 percent when there are ten people in the scene. As-is, this system might struggle to find an assailant on a jam-packed street -- what if it mistakes an innocent gesture for an attack? The creators expect to fly their drone system over two festivals in India as a test, but it's not something you'd want to rely on just yet. There's a larger problem surrounding the ethical implications. There are questions about abuses of power and reliability for facial recognition systems. Governments may be tempted to use this as an excuse to record aerial footage of people in public spaces, and could track the gestures of political dissidents (say, people holding protest signs or flashing peace symbols). It could easily combine with other surveillance methods to create a complete picture of a person's movements. This might only find acceptance in limited scenarios where organizations both make it clear that people are on camera and with reassurances that a handshake won't lead to police at their door. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore.
Nvidia is training robots to learn new skills by observing humans. Initial experiments with the process have seen a Baxter robot learn to pick up and move colored boxes and a toy car in a lab environment. The researchers hope the development of the new deep-learning based system will go some way to train robots to work alongside humans in both manufacturing and home settings. “In the manufacturing environment, robots are really good at repeatedly executing the same trajectory over and over again, but they don’t adapt to changes in the environment, and they don’t learn their tasks, ” Nvidia principal research scientist Stan Birchfield told VentureBeat. “So to repurpose a robot to execute a new task, you have to bring in an expert to reprogram the robot at a fairly low level, and it’s an expensive operation. What we’re interested in doing is making it easier for a non-expert user to teach a robot a new task by simply showing it what to do.” The researchers trained a sequence of neural networks to perform duties associated with perception, program generation, and program execution. The result was that the robot was able to learn a new task from a single demonstration in the real world. Once the robot witnesses the task, it generates a human-readable description of the states required to complete the task. A human can then correct the steps if necessary before execution on the real robot. “There’s sort of a paradigm shift happening in the robotics community now, ” Birchfield said. “We’re at the point now where we can use GPUs to generate essentially a limitless amount of pre-labeled data essentially for free to develop and test algorithms. And this is potentially going to allow us to develop these robotics systems that need to learn how to interact with the world around them in ways that scale better and are safer.” In a video released by the researchers, human operator shows a pair of stacks of cubes to the robot. The system then understands an appropriate program and correctly places the cubes in the correct order. Information gathered by - Robotics for u. Bangalore Robotics, BTM Robotics training center, Robotics spares, Bannerghatta Robotics training center, best robotics training in bangalore,
Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gestures Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory system enable people to correct robot mistakes on multiple-choice tasks. Getting robots to do things isn’t easy, usually, scientists have to either explicitly program them or get them to understand how humans communicate via language. But what if we could control robots more intuitively, using just hand gestures and brainwaves? A new system spearheaded by researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) aims to do exactly that, allowing users to instantly correct robot mistakes with nothing more than brain signals and the flick of a finger. Building off the team’s past work focused on simple binary-choice activities, the new work expands the scope to multiple-choice tasks, opening up new possibilities for how human workers could manage teams of robots. By monitoring brain activity, the system can detect in real-time if a person notices an error as a robot does a task. Using an interface that measures muscle activity, the person can then make hand gestures to scroll through and select the correct option for the robot to execute. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
This Terrifying Robot Wolf is protecting the crops of Japanese Farmers For the last eight months, farms near Kisarazu City in Japan have been home to a horrifying robot wolf. But don’t worry; it wasn’t created to terrorize local residents (although, from the looks of the thing, it probably did). Its official name is “Super Monster Wolf, ” and engineers designed it to stop animals from eating farmers’ crops. In truth, the story of the robot wolf is more than a little sad. As Motherboard reports, wolves went extinct in Japan in the early 1800s. A state-sponsored eradication campaign. Now, parts of Japan are overrun with deer and wild boar. They love to feast on farmers’ rice and chestnut crops. Obviously, farmers do not love this. Fast forward 200 years and humans create a robotic wolf to replace the species they killed off. But there is some good here. The first official trial of the robot wolf just ended and surprised it was a resounding success. In fact, it was such a success that the wolf is entering mass production next month. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP Nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP Nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
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