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2018-07-03T15:04:29
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Army researchers develop A.I. tech that helps U.S. soldiers learn 13x faster than conventional methods. Army researchers are making huge strides in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) that can support U.S. soldiers on the battlefield. Their latest development is an affordable yet capable AI assistant that can reportedly help human troops learn more than 13 times faster than normal training methods. Featuring vastly improved machine learning capabilities, the AI will be installed upon the Army’s future ground combat vehicles. It is intended to help a human soldier spot important clues, recognize the developing situation, and come up with a solution to the problem on the fly. The AI would reportedly help preserve American lives during the chaos of combat. For example, it could keep a lookout for suspicious-looking or behaving vehicles that might be a vehicle-borne improvised explosive device (VBIED) like a car bomb. If it spots any such mobile bomb, it would identify the vehicle as such and warn its user about the threat. Another service it could provide is studying aerial imagery of a battlefield. Based on the available information, the AI can map out probable danger zones that soldiers should enter with extreme caution. Content gathered by BTM robotics training centre, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP Nagar, robotics training centres in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centres in JP Nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore.
2018-07-03T15:02:32
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Experimental drone uses AI to spot violence in crowds. Whether or not it works well in practice is another story. Drone-based surveillance still makes many people uncomfortable, but that isn't stopping research into more effective airborne watchdogs. Scientists have developed an experimental drone system that uses AI to detect violent actions in crowds. The team trained their machine learning algorithm to recognize a handful of typical violent motions (punching, kicking, shooting and stabbing) and flag them when they appear in a drone's camera view. The technology could theoretically detect a brawl that on-the-ground officers might miss, or pinpoint the source of a gunshot. As The Verge warned, the technology definitely isn't ready for real-world use. The researchers used volunteers in relatively ideal conditions (open ground, generous spacing and dramatic movements). The AI is 94 percent effective at its best, but that drops down to an unacceptable 79 percent when there are ten people in the scene. As-is, this system might struggle to find an assailant on a jam-packed street -- what if it mistakes an innocent gesture for an attack? The creators expect to fly their drone system over two festivals in India as a test, but it's not something you'd want to rely on just yet. There's a larger problem surrounding the ethical implications. There are questions about abuses of power and reliability for facial recognition systems. Governments may be tempted to use this as an excuse to record aerial footage of people in public spaces, and could track the gestures of political dissidents (say, people holding protest signs or flashing peace symbols). It could easily combine with other surveillance methods to create a complete picture of a person's movements. This might only find acceptance in limited scenarios where organizations both make it clear that people are on camera and with reassurances that a handshake won't lead to police at their door. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore.
2018-07-03T14:43:33
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Former NASA Engineers Building Real-Life Underwater Transformer. In its ROV mode, Aquanaut has two arms for doing work. A transformer designed to do grunt work for the oil industry and the military is coming, and it’s admittedly kind of fun to look at. Houston Mechatronics, a small company founded and led by a team of former NASA robot engineers, May 1 some major strides toward building a transforming submersible the company calls "Aquanaut." The 2, 315-pound (1, 050 kilograms) unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) will transform itself in order to operate in two modes, according to the company: a sleek, submarine-shaped autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) mode and an unfolded, two-armed remotely operated vehicle (ROV) mode for work. Aquanaut will swim through the water in its sleek AUV mode. When Aquanaut moves through the water, we want as little drag as possible to extend the maximum range of what the vehicle can do on battery power, " Houston Mechatronics spokesperson Sean Halpin said. "By enclosing the limbs, we're able to operate the vehicle over great distances, up to 200 kilometers [124 miles] Content gathered by BTM robotics training centre, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP Nagar, robotics training centres in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centres in JP Nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
2018-07-03T14:40:13
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Wireless 'RoboFly' Looks like an Insect, Gets Its Power from Lasers. You might remember RoboBee, an insect-sized robot that flies by flapping its wings. Unfortunately, though it has to be hard-wired to a power source. Well, one of RoboBee's creators has now helped develop RoboFly, which flies without a tether. Slightly heavier than a toothpick, RoboFly was designed by a team at the University of Washington – one member of that team, assistant professor Sawyer Fuller, was also part of the Harvard University team that first created RoboBee. That flying robot receives its power via a wire attached to an external power source, as an onboard battery would simply be too heavy to allow the tiny craft to fly. Instead of a wire or a battery, RoboFly is powered by a laser. That laser shines on a photovoltaic cell, which is mounted on top of the robot. On its own, that cell converts the laser light to just seven volts of electricity, so a built-in circuit boosts that to the 240 volts needed to flap the wings. That circuit also contains a microcontroller, which tells the robot when and how to flap its wings – on RoboBee, that sort of "thinking" is handled via a tether-linked external controller. Content gathered by BTM robotics training centre, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP Nagar, robotics training centres in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centres in JP Nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
2018-06-29T13:52:15
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This Terrifying Robot Wolf is protecting the crops of Japanese Farmers For the last eight months, farms near Kisarazu City in Japan have been home to a horrifying robot wolf. But don’t worry; it wasn’t created to terrorize local residents (although, from the looks of the thing, it probably did). Its official name is “Super Monster Wolf, ” and engineers designed it to stop animals from eating farmers’ crops. In truth, the story of the robot wolf is more than a little sad. As Motherboard reports, wolves went extinct in Japan in the early 1800s. A state-sponsored eradication campaign. Now, parts of Japan are overrun with deer and wild boar. They love to feast on farmers’ rice and chestnut crops. Obviously, farmers do not love this. Fast forward 200 years and humans create a robotic wolf to replace the species they killed off. But there is some good here. The first official trial of the robot wolf just ended and surprised it was a resounding success. In fact, it was such a success that the wolf is entering mass production next month. Content gathered by BTM robotics training center, robotics in Bangalore, stem education in Bangalore, stem education in Bannerghatta road, stem education in JP Nagar, robotics training centers in Bannerghatta road, robotics training centers in JP Nagar, robotics training for kids, robotics training for beginners, best robotics in Bangalore,
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